Jon Madison will be missed

The news that Jon Madison has sold his business and moved out of Laguna was not a shock, but the swiftness came as a surprise.  Jon will be missed.  While I wish the new owners nothing but the best, it’s hard to imagine Madison Square without Jon, a little like Oz without the wizard. Jon’s café was a place where every person and every dog felt welcome and special.  To borrow from Fanny Flagg’s Fried Green Tomatoes, “It was never more than just a knock about place, but now that I look back on it, when that café closed the heart of the town just stopped beating. It’s funny how a little place like this brought so many people together.”

Jon Stordahl

Laguna Beach


Obituary

Paul Barnard

August 12, 1938 – November 27, 2017

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Paul inserts himself into the void at Le Corbusier’s Notre Dam du Haut in Ronchamp, France

Gentleman, surfer, brilliant architect, master of color – Paul Barnard was all of these, and now he’s gone, slipping away to Mexico and beyond. 

Born in Bailieboro, Ontario, Canada on August 12, 1938, Paul was creative from a young age, preferring the arts to labor on the family farm in Ontario. Attracted to the energy of Toronto, Paul attended the University of Toronto where he received a Bachelor of Architecture. After working and traveling throughout Europe, Paul moved to Boston and received his Master of Architecture in Urban Design from Harvard University in 1967. He married Susan Gleave in 1966 in England and settled in Toronto where their daughter Josey was born in 1968. At the ripe age (for an architect) of 30, Paul designed his parent’s cottage at Batchewana Bay, Ontario. After becoming a partner at WZMH Architects in the 1974, he oversaw the design of projects across the US and Asia. 

To escape the cold winters of the east coast, Paul moved from Canada to Laguna in 1980 to practice architecture in California. Here he married Susan Whitin and had his second child, Seth, in 1987. After a career working on large scale hotels and office buildings, Paul opened up his own studio in Laguna to focus on other building typologies. The Laguna Art Museum is one of his several creative renovations in town. 

An avid hiker and outdoorsman, he and family frequented wild locales across the globe to camp, hike and learn. He always believed one learned more traveling than in school. Fascinated by the ancient cities of South and Central America, he travelled to and studied the urban design practices of Incan, Mayan and Aztecan cultures. Paul’s passion for color drove him to scour Europe in search of obscure natural pigments unavailable in the US. Using color as a design tool, he adorned his designs with these unique pigments. He had an insatiable curiosity.

While growing up on the family farm in Ontario, Paul loved to ride horses. In Laguna, he fulfilled that passion with “Streetwise”, his retired racing horse stabled at Irvine Coast Stables -- on land that is now Crystal Cove. Around town, you could catch Paul on his way to surf San O with his buddies, in a heated conversation at Zinc cafe, or at the dog park with his trusty dogs. 

After living in Laguna for almost 40 years, Paul expatriated to his house in Sayulita, Mexico for a change of scenery and vibes. Shortly after moving to Sayulita, he fulfilled a lifelong dream to live in the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende. 

On November 27, 2017, Paul died peacefully in the cacti-peppered highlands of Central Mexico amongst a loving community of friends and caregivers. His creative, friendly and quirky spirit lives on through the family and friends that love him.

Paul's memorial will be held on Saturday, February 3 at the Laguna Art Museum from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.


Where’s Jason?

We miss Jason Feddy’s banter on his ‘Morning Scramble’ show on KX93.5. What he brings musically both with his talent and knowledge are unique and an asset to our local station. We especially enjoyed his quizzes and police blotter songs. We would like to urge Tyler Russell and the station’s board of directors to please bring him back, even if only on a limited basis! KX93.5 is not the same without him!

Ellen and Roger Kempler

Laguna Beach


Impact of the homeless on home values needs to be addressed by panel

Decades ago I was fortunate enough to be present at a City Council meeting in which representatives of the American Association of University Women made an impassioned presentation advocating the city become a sanctuary city.  The City Council succumbed and voila: Laguna Beach became a sanctuary city.

Thereupon a thin stream of indigents trickled in and took root. They became prominent fixtures at the entrance of the Library on Glenneyre. They leisurely occupied nooks along Ocean Avenue and promenaded along the beach.

Wanting to support these folks and their illegal brethren a hiring center was constructed and manned in the Canyon. Assorted shelters were made available.  The City gave out free bus passes (a continuing program) and constructed a shelter for these unfortunates. Food was made available.

I recall an evening in a Mexican restaurant in which a curiously dressed young lady was shown a table whereupon she ordered and consumed a full meal, stood up and left without paying. The owner simply shrugged his shoulders and smiled; they need help. The Mexican restaurant went out of business.

Now, with the removal of those now occupying the banks of the Santa Ana River, I suspect our village will rise to the task and welcome these poor, misunderstood minions.

Thus, drawn to the natural beauty of the Canyon, one might imagine a quaint hobo jungle developing from lack of space in our Friendship Shelter.

Being an intellectual community, we welcome discussions, and find ourselves invited to spend an enlightened moment with experts on homelessness (for $20). I wonder if the topics these folks cover include the impact on home values as grocery carts stacked high with dross and over stuffed back packs line our back alleys and signs suggesting ‘Work for Food’ become commonplace.

Just a thought, mind you.

John Kountz

Laguna Beach


Coast Inn developer opposes rooftop decks

The owner/developer of the Coast Inn has been dismissive of the concerns of the many neighbors surrounding his development, yet he is well aware of the issues they face, should his project be approved.  

In September 2012 and January 2013, Chris Dornin addressed Planning Commission and City Council with statements in opposition to the rooftop deck at Mozambique. The issues that he presented five years ago are the exact issues that the neighbors around his proposed Coast Inn rooftop deck will be presenting to City Council at Tuesday’s hearing: parking in front of homes, traffic, noise, view, trash, privacy, etc.  

What follows are exact excerpts from his statements which demonstrate that he is well aware that his project will negatively impact the surrounding neighborhoods.  (Video of the full statements is available on the Laguna Beach City website.)

Chris Dornin Statement Sept 12, 2012, Planning Commission Meeting:

“…There’s literally no parking in front of our house during the evenings...”

“…They may have their noise studies but you need to remember this is well above where Coast Highway is and it flows right up hill and it flows right into our bedrooms...”

“…The idea that it’s not going to intensify the traffic is completely silly.  Why spend all this money if you are not going to increase business and increase traffic flow...” 

“…This is going to add significant money to the restaurant in revenue if they are able to do this and it’s going to have detrimental impact to the values in our neighborhood and views like myself.  It is a nightclub.  They charge.  We hear it.  It’s loud.  It’s a privacy, noise and view issue.”

Chris Dornin Statement Jan 15, 2013, Appeal to City Council: “Wear hats”

“…Umbrellas do not provide an ocean view, they are a convenience for the customers. The customers can wear hats. If it’s too sunny, wear hats. They don’t need umbrellas...” 

“…We shouldn’t all sacrifice and the owner make no compromises for any of us and all to the detriment of our home values.  It’s going to have a massive detrimental impact to our home...” 

Terry Meurer

Laguna Beach


The Coast Inn should be a local gem, and it can be

As a small business owner and resident in the neighborhood of the Coast Inn, I am deeply frustrated by the opposition that this project has faced since it was announced.

I have carefully reviewed the documentation related to the project, and it is clear that the developer has longstanding entitlements to renovate the property as has been proposed.

The opposition that the project is facing is coming from a small but vocal group of people who are concerned about the impact the project will have on the surrounding neighborhood.  

The fact that the hotel and liquor store existed long before most people lived in the neighborhood doesn’t seem to register with the critics.

The argument that there’s not enough parking doesn’t hold up when one considers that ride sharing services like Uber and Lyft have forever changed parking requirements.

And finally, one only has to take a walk from Bluebird to downtown on Coast Highway to see the number of vacant storefronts to understand that our town is facing tremendous challenges as the economy is going through transformational change.

The Coast Inn should be a local gem, and we have a group willing and able to make it happen.

To be clear, a revitalized Coast Inn will be good for our business—more visitors, more foot traffic, more vibrancy in our neighborhood.

But the issue goes far beyond what it means for one business.

At the heart of this is whether or not the City of Laguna Beach will adopt a progressive and business friendly position, encourage sensible development, and acknowledge and embrace a rapidly changing marketplace in order to ensure the health and unique character of our special town.

If it is going to be business as usual, I fear that we will simply become a nice place to live for those who can afford it, and the Laguna Beach most of us know and love will be gone forever 

Don Meek

Co-Founder, The Soul Project

Laguna Beach


Supporters’ party is outrageous ploy

I just received a copy email of what the Dornins are planning at the Coast Inn to get letters of approval for the project. Party at the Boom Boom Room. Let us know you’re coming, sign up have some food, drinks? and music to put you in the mood for us to tell you what our plans are and support us.

This is an outrageous ploy by an applicant for a project coming before you this month. They should be held accountable at the CC meeting. I hope you look at this as subterfuge and that the support letters they say they’re hoping to get are from people that actually live in Laguna Beach. If they don’t they should be discounted entirely.

I am not against preserving the Coast Inn and bringing back its historic character, it needs some loving care. But, the plans as they exist now, will leave nothing but a shell of what the Coast Inn was and the neighborhoods surrounding it will be the sacrifice.

Darrylin and Tom Girvin

Laguna Beach


50 years ago today – a watershed year

If you are at the older end of the baby boomer generation like I am, then you probably remember 1968 as a watershed year in American history. It was the pivotal year in which the public’s overall attitude quickly shifted from optimism to confusion. After struggling to make sense of the battle for Hue in Vietnam early in the year and listening to the Beatles’ “White Album” months later, the gap between my parents’ WWII generation and my own was widening by the day. Despite the fact that half a century has elapsed, we still seem to be struggling with many of the same issues today. For example:

Fifty years ago today, North Korea captured the Navy intelligence ship USS Pueblo. The ship was monitoring North Korea from the Tsushima Strait, an ocean channel dividing Korea and Japan. The Navy insisted its ship was operating in international waters, but North Korea said the Pueblo had entered its territory, and dispatched warships and aircraft to intercept it. 

Accounts differ on both sides as to what really happened. Eventually, there was an exchange of gunfire and one American was killed. The North Korean military boarded the Pueblo, captured its crew and brought the ship to port. The Pueblo’s 82 surviving crewmembers reported they were routinely tortured and starved while in captivity. It took 11 months to resolve the incident but set the stage for continued tensions between the two nations. Today, as it continues to develop its nuclear capabilities, the U.S. considers North Korea one of its most challenging problems.

Time marches on is a constant in our lives. Every so often, it pays to look back. I think the Pueblo incident is one of those times.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach


Agate Street stairs are similar to the Woods Cove disaster – but worse

Thank you, thank you to James Pribram for pointing out the total disaster at Agate Street steps.

This is similar to the Woods Cove stairs disaster but worse.  Does the City even interview the construction company on their experience with the ocean or just take the lowest bid, not considering what the consequences will be?

Obviously this company did not consider tides, surf and sand movement and without experience building on the ocean should not have been hired to do this job. The giant blocks and metal runway are a hazard and liability to the public.

My husband and I have been picking large metal rods out of the ocean there that have been left by the company when they first put up a ridiculous green cloth construction fence that lasted about two days.

The City should have learned its lesson from the Woods Cove steps, which had a similar problem – the company hired had no clue how to build on the oceanfront.

Julie Ross

Laguna Beach


What happened to being good stewards of the beach?

Being raised on Pearl/Agate Street Beach. I looked up to the older locals almost like brothers. They were a tough group of surfers – and they taught me to respect the beach and ocean. Which, in a nutshell, meant not only did you not litter, but heaven forbid you walked past a piece of litter without picking it up. These guys were willing to fight every day for the beach they loved. There was a pecking order to every set of locals on every beach. That was the culture I grew up in.

Part of being a local meant being a good steward of the beach. Caring for it. Respecting it. Loving the beach.

I would not consider the Agate Street Beach staircase renovation project being an example of good stewardship of the beach. This project was started nearly four months ago. On a good day, there are maybe two or three guys working on it for one or two days a week, and that’s being generous. There is a huge rusty ramp now descending down from the cliff and into the water at high tide. 

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by James Pribram

Agate Beach

Workers have dumped approximately 37 Lego cement blocks onto the beach, which have already toppled over twice. In their words, “[They] have been put there to keep the ocean out.” 

Haven’t we learned by now that it is simple impossible to keep the ocean out?!

With two major swells forecast for this week and tides nearly reaching into the six-foot range, we (the locals who know the power of the ocean and tides) are extremely worried that all of these construction tools will end up in the ocean and be lost out there for good. This project is a nightmare waiting to happen and quite honestly, it looks as if it has been abandoned. 

In case anyone doesn’t remember, Laguna Beach is a Marine Reserve. It is an absolute no-take zone. No fishing, no nada. You are not even supposed to remove dead seaweed from its natural habitat – the beach. How in the world is such a mismanaged project happening like this in Laguna Beach?

In a town that is supposed to be so environmentally conscious? 

It’s one thing to be picking up metal stakes out of the tide pools and nails with pink ribbons off of the beach. But who is going to pick up the concrete blocks, and the rusty ramp if it goes into the ocean?

What if someone is seriously injured or worse?

When I raised this issue, I wasn’t looking for a fight with the City or the Coastal Commission. In fact, the ECO-Warrior Foundation is a partner of the Coastal Commission and the Adopt-A-Beach program.

The first phone call I made was to the code enforcement officer at the Coastal Commission, who asked me to document everything and send it to him in an email

Which I did. He never replied back regarding the email and didn’t return subsequent phone calls.

The same day I sent a similar email to the mayor. No reply. Then I called her and left a voicemail. She never returned my call.

So then I called the city manager and left a voicemail. No returned call. However I did get a call from Henry Hovakkimian, Assistant Construction Manager, because of my call to the City Manager. 

The only City employee who actually took my call was the chief lifeguard.

I went through the proper channels. Yet no one bothered to get back to me to explain what was going on.

At least someone came and picked up the rusty drills that they left discarded there. 

But is this good stewardship of the beach? Not a chance.

James Pribram

Founder, ECO-Warriors

Laguna Beach


Questions for Coast Inn development supporters

I know that everyone in Laguna Beach would like to see the Coast Inn restored to its former glory. It is currently an eyesore in this town. But to the supporters of Chris Dornin’s proposed development, I have a few questions: Do you know the details of what is being proposed? 332 bar/restaurant seats (200 more than previously approved) plus 24 hotel rooms and not one single parking place, which means hundreds of cars will need to park in the surrounding neighborhood every day, and possibly more when multiple events are held at the various venues.  

Do you know that the Boom Boom Room is not even mentioned in the plans? The name of that space has been changed – and there is no dance floor. Have you considered the increased traffic and public safety issues that will result from this intensification of use? Does our town really need to attract more tourists (last year six million people visited Laguna) and should the goal of attracting tourists be put ahead of the residents’ quality of life?  

Did you know that the hotel will look nothing like the historic photos, but rather the design is based on an artist’s rendering? Did you know that Mr. Dornin, the owner/developer of the Coast Inn fought against the rooftop deck on Mozambique because he lived in the surrounding neighborhood and therefore, as a resident, would be adversely affected?  

In his statements to Planning Commission and City Council, Mr. Dornin raised the exact issues as those who currently oppose the intensification of use of his Coast Inn development: parking, traffic, noise, public safety, view, aesthetics, light trespass, and loss of property value in the surrounding neighborhood. (Video of his testimony at PC and CC can be viewed on the Laguna Beach City website.)  

Of course Mr. Dornin has the right to change his position on rooftop decks, but that does not change the impacts and issues of which he is well aware. Would you support the development of this “entertainment complex” if your home was in the neighborhood around the Coast Inn? Please know that I respect everyone’s opinion and their right to support or oppose this project. For the record, my opinion is that the Coast Inn should be restored to its previous use, but the design and the intensification of use should be denied at Tuesday’s City Council meeting on Jan 23.

Terry Meurer

Laguna Beach


Tempest in a teapot over Agate: Response to James Pribram’s column on 1/16

As a retired builder, overlapping into my current profession as an enviro-consultant specializing in land use and regulatory compliance, this confrontation is a result of a poorly understood process.

Beachgoers have complained for years about this “Stairway To Nowhere,” as the previous one during certain periods ended well short of the sand: Hence people were stranded, either took a literal “leap of faith,” at risk of physical harm due to that gap distance, or were forced to use either Center or Bluebird.

[The current strategy] was signed off on, as the column notes.

First you must demolish, then create/secure a safe, resilient construction zone...Note these blocks are temporary, not permanent structures, too heavy to roll around willy-nilly, pell-mell.

We used a metaphor during construction activities, especially with demolition elements: Like an omelette, eggs must be broken, moreover at times adjustments are made during removal/installation.

Pribram’s parents live close nearby [and] were probably notified of hearings per CEQA et al, as the Project was also posted at the top of the stairs landing per local/state regulations. I saw and read it, went to the City’s website, and I was satisfied that it was basically a reasonable solution to a long-standing unsafe and unacceptable Coastal Access issue.

As critical as myself & my NGO, Clean Water Now, has been over our 20 year history, in this instance where the City finally responded (albeit we feel slowly, we have frustrated friends and family that demanded a remedy), the installation (after two site visits recently) is acceptable to industry and obviously CCC standards.

Personally, the Project’s not as invasive nor housekeeping as slovenly as alleged: Take photos, document complaints/violations using a GPS stamp that secures time/date/exact location of said evidence.

I think one important lesson is to read posted notifications.

Go online or downtown to the Community Development counter, educate yourself as to the Project, its purpose, its duration, the Best Management Practices proposed, etc.

The Marine environment is important, fragile, so yes, be more vigilant: But educate yourself.

The answers, the reasons for certain logistics that seem unacceptable/irregular might already be there.

Land Use is a boring topic, but it’s where the rubber meets the road regarding planning, where your City is going.

Roger E. Bütow

Founder & Executive Director, CLEAN WATER NOW

Laguna Beach


Hotel Laguna should be kept as pristine as possible

I’ve been here since 1958 and one of the first things that our visitors notice when coming into the town is the Hotel Laguna.  It’s a famous landmark and one that the city should try to keep as pristine as possible.  

With that being said, I believe that it’s possible to remodel the hotel to current day standards and still retain the original look and feel.  Something like the La Valencia in La Jolla comes to mind. I hope that the new owners and city council will consider this.

Gary Zaremba

Laguna Beach


Time to impeach Trump

Fifty or so years ago, a young Donald Trump was determined ineligible to serve in Vietnam due to bone spurs in his feet. Despite having graduated from New York Military Academy, Trump was forced to sit on the sidelines and watch his high school classmates march off to war.  

Today, a 70-something Donald Trump serves as President of the United States. As New York Times columnist Charles Blow recently commented, “It is impossible to live your life under the microscope of the presidency and not have your true nature revealed.” That certainly was the case last week when Mr. Trump characterized the homeland of immigrants from Africa and Haiti as @#$%-holes.

That said, I believe it’s time Congress explore the notion of impeaching Mr. Trump. Not so much for what he said about immigrants, but because those testy old bone spurs clearly have gone to his head. As my wise father used to say, “Stay away from that guy. His elevator doesn’t go all the way to the top floor.”  

America deserves a president who is fully capable of executing the requirements of the job.  As a lifelong student of politics, I am shocked Trump’s @#$%-hole comment hasn’t been completely rebuked by the GOP leaders in the House and Senate. I am sorry, but Speaker Paul Ryan’s tepid reaction that Trump’s hateful outburst was “unfortunate” really doesn’t cut it.

It’s time to look in the mirror people.  What does your reflection reveal about you and our country now?  It’s not too late to change what you see.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach


Historic Preservation Task Force: Necessary?

After attending the special City Council meeting on Sat Dec.16 2017 I came away thinking do the residents & property owners of Laguna Beach really need “this”! Only one of eleven of my North Laguna neighbors who I meet as I took a morning walk, thinks it’s a good idea. The other ten gave it the thumbs down.

Just because the vocal minority and the City’s bureaucrats want it doesn’t mean that it’s best for the community! Before the City forms a Task Force lets put the idea on the ballot or at least a survey of all property owners who might be impacted. Give the silent majority a voice, it’s only fair!

Pat Galez

Laguna Beach


Hotel Laguna is in desperate need of renovation

I have followed the continuing saga of the Hotel Laguna and have a few comments. First of all, a lawsuit seeking “financial restitution” truly seems without merit (no pun intended).

Regarding the hotel name, although Mrs. Andersen says it’s trademarked, photos from the 1930s show that the name has been in use since the beginning. I’m not an attorney, but isn’t there such a thing as public domain?

The Andersens operated the property for 30 years and never did a significant renovation. The entire place is run down and in desperate need of attention. Why would we think they’d choose to do so now? I understand that Andersen has a sentimental attachment to the hotel, but it’s time to move on. She has been operating two restaurants — both out of town — one of which has been open 18 months. Doesn’t that imply an “exit strategy”?

I worked with Joe Hanauer during his acquisition of The Pottery Shack and transformation into The Old Pottery Place. At the beginning there was opposition but, now, rightly beloved with resident serving businesses, including one of few remaining brick and mortar bookstores. There could not be a man more devoted to keeping the historic aspects of our community intact … but improved. And with Greg MacGillivray as a named partner… along with James Ray, I’d call them the dream team to take control of the run down hotel, and continue to be fine stewards of our village, as has been Mark Christy with The Ranch. 

Thank goodness The Montage sold Christy and partners the property, or we’d almost certainly have condos on the golf course by now.

Leslie Cunningham

30-year resident of Laguna Beach


No soul in concrete stairs at Thalia

Why is it [that] each project taken on by the Corps of Engineers, when finished, looks like something built by the Corps of Engineers?  No soul!  Couldn’t they use river rock or flagstone or something that is not concrete?

Robert Story

Laguna Beach


Obituary

Ben Rogers

January 27, 1994 – December 13, 2017

Ben Rogers passed away peacefully in the early morning hours of December 13.  

Ben was the light of all our lives, full of a deep kindness towards all, a generous spirit, and a light-hearted presence. Many have shared how Ben would encourage them, and how much he was looking forward to the future. He touched many.  

He and his sister Lily were born in Newtown Connecticut one frozen winter night, moved to Grosse Pointe Farms Michigan at age three, then to Laguna Beach when four.  Ben grew up a local boy, attending the Presbyterian preschool, TOW Elementary, Thurston and the High School. He was an Indian Guide, a Scout, played soccer, but most of all LOVED playing basketball at the Boys and Girls Club and anywhere, really.

His first job was delivering the Laguna Beach Indy in the Mystic Hills neighborhood. He studied Kempo Karate for eight years and also competed at the County level in Track and Field in the Hurdles. 

He attended the Army and Navy Academy in Carlsbad and was able to march in the National Memorial Day parade in Washington DC in 2011, playing the snare drum.

Ben attended the University of Arizona, and was planning to finish up at Cal State San Marcos in the fall.  

He is survived by his parents, Kate and Jim, his twin Lily, his brother Will, his step-sister Sara, and also his beloved dogs Gracie and Coco.

A memorial service is planned at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church on Saturday, December 30 at 10 a.m. All are welcome to come remember and celebrate Ben.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ben’s name to the ASPCA.


Obituary

Steven P. Duncan

April 4, 1954 – December 15, 2017

Steven Paul Duncan passed away Friday, December 15, 2017, at the age of sixty three surrounded by his entire family. He is survived by his wife Anne, his four children, Madison, Riley, Jamie, and Liam, his very soon to be son-in-law Graham Harris, and his mischievous cattle dog, Marley.  

Born in London, England and raised back and forth between Geneva, Kentucky and California, Steve first moved to Laguna Beach in 1962 with his mother, Betty and his grandparents Emily and Will Cowie. The family later opened the Horseshoe Cafe in downtown Laguna Beach. A graduate of Laguna Beach High School and University of California Irvine, he earned his JD from the University of San Diego in 1986 and proceeded to run his own practice in Laguna Beach as a plaintiffs’ personal injury lawyer.  

Steve lived a life as full as his booming laugh. He was cultured, irreverent, and the sharpest of wits. He was an avid tennis player, surfer, and sailor in his younger years. Steve loved the time he spent ranching and co-owning a dairy calf business. He also loved playing—or as he would say, “trying to play”—the guitar and listening to opera, show tunes, and the Appalachian music his Kentucky grandmother used to sing.  

More than anything, he loved his family. Steve refused to let the harshness of his earlier years take his goodness, and worked hard every day to change the trajectory of that life for his children. With a heart even bigger than his personality, Steve welcomed any and all into the warm embrace of his family and modeled integrity through his words and actions. Of all of Steve’s accomplishments and adventures, nothing brought him greater pride than his wife and children, whose compassion, humanity, and humor will carry his legacy.


There are solutions to the short term lodging challenges

Thanks to the City staff, appointed and elected Laguna Beach officials, and all those involved for all the time and effort spent developing for Laguna a fair, balanced, and equitable approach to the issue of short term lodging.

After all that effort, is must be frustrating that late in the day at its hearing last Thursday, after hours of detailed deliberations over a few parking spaces in Malibu and old pipes at Playa Vista, the Coastal Commission announced that they only had the room until 7:00PM and that the hearing on Laguna’s adopted ordinance would be constrained by that time limit.

The result was short shrift given to all sides in a hurry-up hearing of Laguna’s request for certification of an amendment to its Local Coastal Plan incorporating the short-term lodging ordinance the City has adopted unanimously after many months of and thousands of hours of citizen and City debate.  (And not that many issues in Laguna result in unanimous opinions.)  Whether a more extensive hearing of an issue with widespread consequences for many communities throughout California would have led to a better decision is debatable, but what is not debatable is the appropriateness, or actually lack thereof, of the manner in which the hearing was held.

While most Californians understand the mission of the Coastal Act is to assure there are no gates or fences impeding physical coastal access, the current Coastal Commission seems to be embarking on its own social engineering mission, 1) aggressively broadening its scope by stretching definitions and 2) imposing unfunded mandates on local communities.

Its current efforts to reinterpret the word “access” as more than physical access to include a requirement that local communities provide unlimited affordable vacation accommodations to anyone who wants a day at any specific beach of the visitor’s choosing at any time of their choosing at a price the visitor can afford reflects both these issues.  The stretch of the definition is obvious. 

An unfunded mandate is a requirement by one level of government that another level of government perform certain actions with no funds provided to do so.  In this case, the state requires cities to do something costly and requires the city to absorb the cost.  That the Coastal Commission is doing this to local communities is less obvious, but no less consequential.

While visitors bring additional revenue to a community, visitors also bring additional cost. The problem is, in Laguna’s case, the additional cost far exceeds the additional revenue. Because Laguna graciously hosts so many visitors annually, compared to other cities in California with our population, the cost to run the government of the City of Laguna Beach is roughly three times the cost to run cities of similar size with little or no visitor impact. The shortage is made up by the residents with funds paid by local residents that should be used for local resident needs that are instead diverted to cover the extra costs due to visitors.

There are solutions - -two of which are:  The State of California Coastal Commission can rein back in its overreach and work for reasonable balance between visitors and residents. And the State of California can provide the funds to the local communities that will cover the additional costs resulting from the state’s requirements. By the way, that number – the shortage -- is about $25,000,000 per year or something like $2,000 per year per Laguna household.

John Thomas

Laguna Beach


Sign numbing

For a City with the strictest sign code, we sure do love electronic message boards! These PD signs are meant to warn drivers of dangers related to traffic, accidents, etc., yet the LBPD inexplicably has decided to use them constantly, at several locations in, out and around town, to display such helpful messages as “Have a nice day!” and “Happy Holidays!” Really? This is the “look” we want for our town? Now we are numb to the signs, so if they do display useful messages for their intended purpose, we won’t pay any attention! And as a bonus, they increase the danger to cyclists, by forcing them into traffic. Thanks LBPD! 

Ann Marie McKay

Laguna Beach


Obituary

Catalina Raine Kollock

November 14, 2017 – December 16, 2017

Catalina Raine Kollock was born with tremendous love at home on November 14, 2017. On the morning of December 16, 2017 she passed peacefully from this world surrounded by her loving family. 

Catalina Raine is a perfect angel. She is a beautiful ray of light who is loved deeply by family and friends. In her brief time on this earth, her radiant soul touched the lives of so many. Though she is no longer with us in body, her spirit will forever live on in all of our hearts.

Catalina Raine will always be cherished and loved by her mother and father, Teresa and Ryan, her brother Jackson, her three sisters Layla, Stella, and Scarlett, her grandmother Donna, her great grandmother Gloria, her uncle Joey, and so many more who were blessed to know her.

Memorial services will be held at Neighborhood Congregational Church in Laguna Beach on Friday, December 29, 2017 at 3 p.m. followed by a brief reception at Bridge Hall. The family requests that guests please dress colorfully and avoid wearing black.

In lieu of flowers, the family would be eternally grateful for donations to their GoFundMe www.gofundme.com/kollockfamily, Paypal (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ), or Venmo www.venmo.com/Ryan-Kollock.

All of these will help support the family in these trying times.

Shaena Stabler is the Owner, Publisher & Editor.

Lynette Brasfield is our Features Editor.

Dianne Russell is our Associate Editor.

Maggi Henrikson is our Contributing Editor.

Michael Sterling is our Webmaster.

Katie Ford is our Ad Designer.

Alexis Amaradio, Barbara Diamond, Cameron Gillespie, Dennis McTighe, Diane Armitage, Laura Buckle, Marrie Stone, Samantha Washer and Suzie Harrison are staff writers and/or columnists.

Mary Hurlbut and Scott Brashier are the staff photographers.

Stacia Stabler is our Account & Instagram Manager.

We all love Laguna and we love what we do.

Email: Shaena@StuNewsLaguna.com for questions about advertising

949.315.0259

Email: Lynette@StuNewsLaguna.com with news releases, letters, etc.

949.715.1736