Obituary

Doug Case

September 20, 1956 – January 30, 2018

Douglas Ward Case, 61, was born on September 20, 1956 in Laguna Beach and passed away on January 30, 2018. Doug is remembered by his children - Laura Ann and Charles Emerson, Daniel and Heather Case and grandson Oliver, Nicole and Jon Johnson; his parents Storm and Shirley Case; his siblings Linda Case, Scott and Laurie Case, and many nieces and nephews.

Doug grew up in Laguna Beach and was a descendent of the Thurston family. He attended the first preschool season at the Laguna Presbyterian Church. He enjoyed sports, scouting and backpacking in the Sierra mountains. Doug earned his Eagle Scout rank with Troop 35. He held the Orange County high jump record (6’ 10.25”) for several years. He graduated from Laguna Beach High School in 1974 and attended Biola University. Doug followed his grandfather Alvin Krueger into the real estate appraisal field, opening his own office in Laguna before moving to Salt Lake City. Doug especially loved adventures with his dog Bonsai and filled his free time with books, fly fishing and camping in the mountains of Utah. 

Doug’s memorial will be held at the Laguna Presbyterian Church on Saturday, February 24 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Laguna Presbyterian Church (415 Forest Ave, Laguna Beach, CA 92651) or the American Heart Association in Doug’s memory.


Time to close Liberty Island National Park?

In an effort to assist the Trump administration in its efforts to balance the budget to reflect its objectives, I propose the following cost-saving measure for Secretary of the Interior Zinke: close the Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island National Park. 

What, do I hear knee-jerk wails of objection? Unamerican! Sacrilege!  Read the attached plaque on the base of the Statue.  No, really read it.  If that’s too tasking, read at least the most commonly recognized lines:

Bring me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to be free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.  Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door.

Written by Emma Lazarus in 1883, it was finally engraved on a plaque and mounted on the base of the statue in 1903.

For countless immigrants, those words have been, in their minds, emblematic of the United States and its understanding that our strength as a nation is grounded in its diversity and the contributions of each immigrant, both individuals and families that came to our country and made it theirs. Countless thousands, from Colonial times to the present, have contributed their strengths and determination, and in many cases their lives, in ways that have taken this country to its pre-eminent position in the world. 

Alas, that statue and its meaning seem true no longer.  The Trump administration seems determined to change the acceptable reasons for allowing immigration to this country.  In a mean-spirited turn of malice, the criteria seem to be now qualifying levels of education, financial worth, and not being from some backward, crudely-characterized nations.  A far cry from the “huddled masses yearning to be free”, it seems.  As a side note, I wonder how Mr. Trump’s paternal grandfather in 1885, and indeed his mother in 1930, would have fared had the current proposed criteria been in place when they immigrated. 

The New Colossus and its iconic poem are neither relevant nor representative of the Trump view of immigration.  So, let us actually be honest with ourselves and the world, and shut down Liberty Island until such time as national policy once again is in accord with the symbol in New York Harbor, and the United States of America can once again become a nation that the rest of the world sees as a shining beacon of what the best of mankind can strive for.

Bob Elster

Laguna Beach


No military parade, Mr. President

I don’t want a military parade like President Trump does. I want an America where people celebrate our nation’s long-held values and principles daily. You know, like my Laguna friends who support the Food Pantry, SchoolPower and Friendship Shelter. They are the real patriots. No amount of tanks driving by or troops marching in formation can match what they do.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach


Obituary

Laura Dorothy Krill

February 17, 1920 – September 30, 2017

Dorothy died on September 30, 2017, at her home in Laguna Beach, CA.  She did it on her own time and with her usual flair, stubborn to the end. She is survived by sons John S. Krill, Laguna Beach, CA, C. David Krill, Atascadero, CA, and daughter Nancy M. Krill, Port Townsend, WA, 7 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

Laura Dorothy Phillips was born February 17, 1920 in Hartford, CN and grew up in Queens, NY. She was the oldest of 5 children, and the last surviving sibling. Her father died when she was 7 years old and she always felt the need to look after her brothers and sister. The family was active in the Salvation Army and she liked to tell stories of playing the trumpet and alto horn during the holidays for the Army. Her mother was from Halifax, Nova Scotia and she had many fond memories of a visit to Halifax when she was 12 years old. Throughout her life she maintained close contact with her Canadian cousins.  In 1939, she earned a certificate in infant care from the Salvation Army’s Brooklyn Nursery and Infants’ Hospital.

She met her husband Charles (Chuck) Kennedy Krill, an electrical engineer, in Chicago and they were married in Brooklyn on November 26, 1942. They moved to Southern California in 1947 living in Burbank and Glendale in the 50’s and 60’s, where she became a member of the First Methodist Church and active in the choir. They had four children, John, David, Nancy and Brian.  Vacations in those early years were spent camping at Yosemite, Sequoia, Lake Tahoe, as well as many summers camping at Carpenteria Beach.  

In August 1964, Dorothy, Chuck, Nancy and Brian moved to Tokyo, Japan, where they lived for two years. Dorothy took up flower arranging, taught English, and took full advantage of being in Asia, traveling within Japan as well as Hong Kong and Cambodia.  In 1966 the family returned to California via the old USSR, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Britain. The travel bug had captured her sense of adventure.

In 1972 Dorothy started Krill Tours & Travel in Laguna Beach and soon thereafter her daughter Nancy joined her. Over the next 10 years Dorothy and Chuck traveled all over the world, taking several foreign trips a year. One of her favorite places was Hawaii which she first visited in 1950. They bought, along with three other couples, a condominium on Kaanapali Beach, Maui in the 70’s and, after Chuck’s death in 1982, she bought an apartment near Diamond Head in Waikiki. She continued to run the travel agency another 20 years. She loved to tell stories of all her many travels to the delight of all who listened.

Social activities were important to Dorothy and she loved to host groups in her home. She was a very active member of the Business and Professional Women, the Laguna Beach chapter of Soroptimist International, and the Laguna Beach United Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir, was involved in the Missions Committee and was a member of a Bible Study Group. Originally a Republican, she became a Democrat after the Barry Goldwater nomination, and remained a very active member in the Orange County and Laguna Beach Democratic clubs. Before elections she could often be found in front of the Laguna Beach Post Office registering voters.  

Music played an important part in Dorothy’s life. When she was a young girl, it was common for family friends to visit and sing hymns. She began singing in her church choir in the early 1950’s and continued to do so until her death, more than 60 years later. In the late 1950’s she was part of a singing trio called the 3 Clubs, performing at local community and church events. She was very proud of the fact that she had sung at the Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, and Carnegie Hall, NYC. Dorothy’s Bible Study Group has purchased a memorial plaque for her to be placed alongside the one for Chuck in the Laguna Beach United Methodist Church courtyard. The plaque will be dedicated on the 18th of February at 11:30 am. She was known for her loyalty to friends and will be missed by them and her family. Donations in Dorothy’s honor can be made to the LBUMC Missions Committee.


Good news to share

I have some good news to share. 

The City Council is often bombarded by people expressing concern about the challenges faced by Laguna brick and mortar businesses and expressed in terms of the number of vacant storefronts. And the general message is that “The City needs to do something about it.”

There was an excellent example of that at midnight two weeks ago when a parade of speakers, some of whom even live here, explained to us how Laguna, with 6,000,000 annual visitors and well over $700,000,000 of annual retail and hotel room sales, is blighted and comatose and is on the road to ruin – like La Jolla -- if the City Council doesn’t take extreme measures to reinvigorate the economy through massive injections of alcohol into visitors.

In an era of fake news, it’s important to do some occasional fact checking into just how critical the patient is.

And what better source of information could there be than the Chamber of Commerce website which lists commercial vacancies?

Checking that site, I found there are currently 36 retail, office, and industrial properties available.  Some are vacant and some will become available in the future. 

I checked with commercial property brokers for a Laguna Beach commercial vacancy factor, but being a small market, the larger providers of commercial data do not break out numbers for Laguna.

So, I checked to see how many businesses there are in Laguna. There are nearly 3,900 business licenses in Laguna. 36 vacancies for 3,900 businesses didn’t sound so bad.

But since not all businesses occupy a commercial address, I checked with the post office for business addresses, and there are 1,447 business addresses in Laguna (not counting Post Office Boxes) so, 36 vacancies out of 1,447 physical addresses is about two and a half percent commercial vacancy.  That’s probably a good estimate of commercial vacancies.

For comparison, I then looked for vacancies in Orange County and nationally and found that while the national average for retail vacancy is 6.6 percent, Orange County does much better with only 3.6 percent.  But at two and a half percent, Laguna is far more healthy than either Orange County or the nation as a whole.

I also looked at new business formations and failures and found that nationally about eight percent of all businesses either start up new or fail in any year. 

And, in fact, only 50 percent of new businesses survive five years.

So, businesses turn over. For many reasons.  Sometimes success. Sometimes failure. Sometimes due to growth. Or sale of the business.  And turnover can cause vacancy, but turnover is normal. And that’s the point. And, in fact, Laguna is doing much better than most.

There is no question that this is a trying time for brick and mortar retail. And, while no one wants to see businesses falter, on the other hand, our City Council has no obligation to guarantee the profits of private businesses.

And if an investor pays too much, or promises his investors too much, the City has no duty to bail him out.

John Thomas

Laguna Beach


Undergrounding Survey necessary?

After attending the council meeting last night and watching the presentation regarding the results of the community survey, I’m convinced these surveys and committees are a waste of time and our tax dollars.  

This survey was directed entirely toward placing the blame of a catastrophe from fire, flood or earthquake on the utility poles. It blames the poles as the cause of our lack of safety when evacuating and congestion when there is an emergency. Correct me if I’m wrong but I don’t remember the poles being a problem during the evacuation in the 1993 fires.  

The property owners for the last 20 years have been undergrounding their neighborhoods on their own at their own expense to improve their views. The thought of creating a better “evacuation route” was not even considered.  There were neighborhoods currently going through the process when they heard about this bond issue and learned their street was designated an “evacuation route”. Of course they stopped the process with the expectation that the rest of us will now be paying for their properties. Several property owners last night urged the council to extend the evacuation route to include their neighborhood so they can also benefit on free undergrounding.

This survey should have had a fourth option. The property owners should be required to pay their own undergrounding regardless of any arbitrary “evacuation routes”.  Every street is an evacuation route in an emergency depending on which direction the threat is coming from. Those of us that have already paid for our neighborhood shouldn’t be required to pay for those that haven’t.

All the time and money going out for this survey could have been better spent to possibly help offset the costs for the neighborhoods and canyon where there are larger poles. FYI, this survey would have been free if they utilized Google Form or for a minimal charge with Survey Monkey. The council wasn’t happy with how the survey was conducted or the results and wants the panel to do another survey and report back in several months. 

 Of course, at an additional expense from our tax dollars.

Jill Cooper

Laguna Beach


Mighty Telephone Pole

I was watching the movie To Catch a Thief a few days ago that was made back in 1955. As many of you know the film was made in Cannes and Nice, France along the French Riviera. The views of the countryside reminded me very much of our Laguna Beach. The climate there is very similar to the climate we so appreciate here. Flora of the hillsides looks very similar to our hillsides as well. 

Both of these French cities are destinations for millions of tourists, again very similar to Laguna Beach. When the camera filmed scenes of the countryside many telephone poles were noticed lining the winding roadways of the area. Some of these poles were located very close to these narrow roadways. What is seen reminded me a great deal of the many telephone poles that exist in our fine City. 

Yes, the film was done years ago and yet one could just bet those very same poles still exist today. Folks in that area of the world do the same as folks here in Laguna Beach, they have learned to live with their poles and we all have to until there comes a time when technology can eliminate the poles completely. The French are not attempting to underground their poles most likely because of the cost to do so and with no demands being made by the citizens or their government. 

Additionally, during my drives to various locations close by, that many of us have been to, such as Glen Oak, Arrowhead, Big Bear, Mammoth, Julian and other highly forested communities that are tourist destinations [which] would be considered high risks for fires as is Laguna Beach, I see that the poles are there. The transformers are there. The roadway through many of these communities is even way more dangerous then our Canyon Road. 

So, why the alarm in our town about the fire risks we face that are so similar to many other communities? Why this race to underground? How are similar communities dealing with their poles? One must admit however, do these poles add any beauty to our town? Absolutely not. Try getting a telephone pole included in your landscape planning. The pole in your garden covered with morning glory vine will not be allowed. Have any of you ever seen a pretty pole?

However, at this time, in our community, we must learn to live with our very own telephone poles just like hundreds of thousands if not millions of others must do the same for the decades yet to come. What has been expressed in the news media about causes of fires the telephone pole is ranked way down the list. Those businesses that are responsible for the maintenance of all poles in our town take extra caution to be sure the poles remain safe and good repair. If poles are neglected these companies will be held accountable. 

The fear that is being generated by those citizens in our city and those in our government who support this costly undergrounding is both unfounded and unnecessary as well as a poorly laid tactic. Many of us are waiting to be more and more informed about this costly project and how it dictates such a rapid decision. 

In the meantime...let’s continue to live with the poles as best we can. We have been doing so for many years. 

Jim Gothard

Laguna Beach resident and property owner


Sian Poeschl, thank you

I just had to write and say thank you for:

The heavenly rainbow consolation memorial art installation next to the artistically cut pepper tree remains.

The amazing movie last night at Friday Night Flicks at the Forum, “Loving Vincent,” amazing! 

Supporting the wonderful fallen concrete mural on the beach.  

You and your commission are such a gift to our town. More, please?

Jheri St. James

Laguna Beach


Just add water?

I am not a trained firefighter but I am a skilled waterman. Strategically applied, water puts out fire.

Sometimes we can combine a few problems and synergistically develop a creative solution. What happens if we take the 1.6 million gallons of secondary sewage discharged by Laguna Beach into the ocean each day just over one mile offshore and upcycle this wasted wastewater to provide a citywide perimeter “new water” wildfire pipeline? Our biosolids and sludge in wastewater can be harvested as bio-coal to feed thermal oxidation of wastewater contaminates like pharmaceuticals, microbead plastics and similar guck that otherwise ends up in the ocean. Heat generated feeds a steam turbine to power wastewater filtration. Alternatively, fuel cells can operate from our natural biogas.

By combining the problem of expensive utility undergrounding to include a space in the trench for a new water line in Laguna Canyon, trenching costs can be supplemented with generous State recycle water grants. Laguna would have an independent source of “green” energy and new high purity water for wildfire prevention and suppression as long as we continue to flush our toilets daily.

The estimated cost of a new water system for Laguna is $30 million over the 30-year pipeline life cycle or $1 million per year. Less secondary sewage offshore, more new water for wildfire protection and State funds for Laguna Canyon utility undergrounding is possible when we combine multiple problems to create new, smart, sustainable solutions. 

When do we get started?

Mike Beanan

South Laguna


Are we headed for a constitutional crisis?

As a bona fide member of the Baby Boomer generation, I witnessed two constitutional crises in my 20s. Both happened during my earliest days living in Laguna. 

The first, over the vehement objections of the Nixon administration, was the Supreme Court’s decision to allow the Washington Post and New York Times to publish the Pentagon Papers in 1971. If you need a primer on this topic, then go see “The Post” in a nearby theatre. 

The second was the Watergate scandal beginning in 1972.  For those who have forgotten or never knew it, Richard Nixon tried to eviscerate the Constitution in order to remain in office. His efforts went down in flames and he was forced to resign the presidency in August of 1974.

Now, with the publication of what rapidly is becoming known as the House Intelligence Committee’s Nunes Memo, America appears to be on the precipice of another constitutional crisis. 

Don’t take my word for it. Here is how legendary reporter Carl Bernstein who, along with Bob Woodward, not only stuck with the initial story about the Watergate break-in, they steadfastly followed leads that eventually took readers straight into the Oval Office:

“A real slaughter by an obstructive, irresponsible, partisan gang in the House of Representatives has put the interests of their party and the president of the United States and his personal fortunes above the national interest,” he said.

Asked whether he thinks the U.S. is heading toward a constitutional crisis, Bernstein replied, “Yes, if the president continues down this road, and if his enablers in Congress continue down this road, it could become a constitutional crisis in the sense that the system may fail us.”

I’m not surprised how quickly people lined up for or against President Donald Trump’s decision to release the Nunes Memo. That was expected. What I didn’t expect was how contentious the relationship between the White House, the FBI and Department of Justice truly has become. 

So it’s a little like deja vu all over again. In Nixon’s day, he authorized the FBI to surreptitiously enter private offices, as well as allow the CIA to gather internal information about U.S. citizens here at home. Both were so politically toxic and obviously illegal, most of the president’s Republican supporters in Congress were left with little choice but to cut and run.

Which brings me full circle to Bernstein’s comment about our current situation. I wonder how Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would have reacted had they been in office during Watergate? It’s a question that no one can possibly answer with any authority, but certainly worth contemplating given today’s hyper-partisan landscape. 

Why? Because it only is the future of our democracy that is at stake. I hope I’m wrong but, based on their current level of support for President Trump, I am fearful the actions of the Speaker and the Majority Leader could lead to fewer freedoms for the next generation of Americans now coming of age.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach


Trees and charm in Laguna: We have to do something 

I grew up in Corona del Mar, but I began working at age seven for my Dad who was building single houses in Laguna Beach. Our family loved the artistic community—the old, European-style historic buildings that had been carefully protected over the years. We also loved the trees that had been planted by an artistic group led by Harry Lawrence, a man interested in preserving Laguna’s history as a place characterized by groves of trees—eucalyptus and others. 

Ten years later, in 1963, my family and I moved to the village we loved. And we’ve continued to love it just as much ever since.

Thankfully, about 25 years ago, a group of Planners, Architects, and Artists gathered together to create Laguna’s Downtown Specific Plan. They worked hard to describe the desired look, feel, and function of our Downtown area, a place where we locals wanted to protect forever Laguna’s charm. That plan called out for “an abundance of well-cared for flowers, trees, and shrubs.” It says, “In Laguna’s Downtown, large Eucalyptus, Date Palms, Pepper, and Sycamore trees combine artistically to make a pleasant pedestrian environment.” In fact, Peppertree Lane is singled out in that plan as “the example of Laguna Beach’s village character.”

The City Council has approved this plan ten times over the years—and it is a plan that shows trees placed every 30 to 40 feet on both sides of the downtown streets to provide a canopy of shade for all us locals to enjoy. I’m sad to say that about 25 percent of those trees are yet to be planted! None of these trees would block views of the ocean from hillside homes or downtown residences.

This approved plan has been our town’s guideline of beauty and charm. And now, a committee is updating the plan—but something has changed in Laguna in the past 25 years. Today, there is a war on trees and, to some degree, a war on charm. Part of this is driven by the fact that a lot of our artists have moved away, so there are fewer artistic types to say, “Hey, that looks ugly!” 

So, is there a way to save Laguna’s charm? Can we hire a “Commissioner of Charm” to work with John Pietig and his staff? What if our active group pays half the salary for ten years? Whatever the solution, we have to do something, as our town’s trees and charm are the reasons that my family and many others have settled here. 

Greg MacGillivray

Laguna Beach


Disenchanted with quotes from Harley Rouda campaign about the pre-endorsement delegate meeting – I was one of the “83”

I was disenchanted and surprised to read the quotes by Michael McLaughlin, who released statements about the pre-endorsement delegates [in Tuesday’s edition of Stu News Laguna].

Yes, there is still a race to determine who will be the Democratic Congressman for the 48th. But Mr McLaughlin’s assessment is not accurate, since it is slanted, and intentionally tries to undermine the integrity and gravitas of the pre endorsement vote. Hans Keirstead won this vote by a margin of 67 percent. I am quite certain his views differ from Mr McLaughlin’s.

A “pre-endorsement meeting of about 83 people meeting in a gymnasium...”

This vote “has nothing to do with anything that happens at the convention...”

I was one of the pre-endorsement delegates. The language used by Mr McLaughlin demeans the significance of my role, and is dismissive at best, to other citizens who take on political responsibilities.

I was selected to be a pre-endorsement delegate by the LBDC. All general members were asked to participate.

I attended many forums to hear the candidates debate and sat through many presentations.

I know for a fact that every candidate running for the 48th was determined to win this pre-endorsement made by “about 83 people meeting in a gymnasium.” I personally received many emails, and phone calls, by many candidates, soliciting my vote. If my vote were of no consequence...why? Why was I asked to participate in something meaningless?

If in fact this vote “has nothing to do with anything that happens at the convention,” as articulated by Michael McLaughlin, why would Mr Rouda and other candidates be so anxious to win the pre-endorsement delegates’ votes?

“Falsely claiming Democratic Party recommendation,” as written by Mr. Rouda’s campaign, is equally circuitous.

What Mr Keirstead did win, undeniably, and truthfully...was 67 percent of the pre-endorsement votes. Democrats. Who DID recommend that Dr Keirstead be recommended by the Democratic Party.

Dr Keirstead won by two-thirds of the pre-endorsement votes...a clear majority. Mr McLaughlin’s attempt to demean and undermine Dr Keirstead’s character and campaign seem to be an early example of what all Democrats fear...splitting the vote and opening the door to the Republican party.

Jahn M. Levitt

Laguna Beach


Is no smoking law killing business?

With numerous stores closing and retail spaces for rent all over town, I heard one manager say they had the slowest day in history last week. Five dollars. Is the new no smoking rule partially killing business in Laguna?

Roger Carter

Laguna Beach


U.S. Aircraft Carrier to Visit Vietnam

The irony of the following announcement hasn’t been lost on this long time Laguna resident and father of three. Last week, Defense Secretary James Mattis confirmed that a U.S. aircraft carrier will visit Vietnam soon. It will be first time since the war in Vietnam ended more than 40 years ago, that a ship of this size and magnitude will port in Danang. Many speculate that the presence of the aircraft carrier will be welcomed by several countries nervously eyeing China’s island-building activities in the South China Sea.

Because I was an undergrad at USC from 1966 to 1970, I remember that today marks the 50th anniversary of the bloody Tet Offensive in Vietnam. In many ways, Tet was the beginning of the end of U.S. involvement in the war. The coordinated attack by 85,000 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese targeted dozens of major cities and towns in South Vietnam. To say that it caught US-led forces by surprise is an understatement.  

Named after the Vietnamese Lunar New Year, Tet was a holiday the North and South had previously observed together. U.S. and South Vietnamese forces eventually regained control of the areas they lost during Tet; still, it became a wake-up call for Americans back home who, by now, were watching the horrific news about the war unfold before them daily on TV. After hearing famed CBS news anchor Walter Cronkite declare the war unwinnable, President Lyndon Johnson told his aides, “If I’ve lost Cronkite, then I’ve lost Middle America.”  

More than 58,000 U.S. troops died in the Vietnam War. No telling how many North and South Vietnamese were killed during the war. I often have wondered what life would have been like for the tens of thousands of young Americans who died there had they lived. Two who came home, John McCain and John Kerry, ended up running for president. My hope is, in an odd way, this impending visit by a U.S. aircraft carrier will help heal the many wounds of that terrible war.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach


Laguna is lightning in a bottle

I’m grateful! 

I was raised in Orange California. Money was tight, so during the summer, while other families went to theme parks, the movies or vacations, my family was on the beach in Laguna...a lot. During the 70’s the drive to Laguna started on a two-lane highway lined with eucalyptus trees. My mom packed sandwiches, and let my sisters and I explore Laguna unsupervised for hours. All she asked is we stay away from the hippies and come back before sundown. We explored every cave, cove, giggle crack and tide pool possible. I never dreamed I would live in Laguna 40 years later. 

In 2010 my husband Steve and I bought a house on Catalina Street by Oak. We are still pinching ourselves...how did we get so lucky to live in this paradise?

The drive through Laguna Canyon is like a portal to another dimension, unlike anywhere else in OC. 

Today [Sunday] was stunning, dazzling. The sun glistened on the water like diamonds, the warm breeze blew. Is this January?!  It›s insane.

Submitted photo

The sun glistened on the water like diamonds…

And I love Stu News. It keeps me up to date on dining, entertainment and community events.  Thank you. And my condolences on Stu. I’m sad I never met him, but I understand he was the coolest guy ever. You’ve done a good job maintaining his legacy (Stu News). 

I’m so grateful to live here! And grateful for all the wonderful friends I’ve made in this unique, fabulous community. 

Thank you thank you thank you.

Laura Lee

Laguna Beach

Editor’s Note: Thank you so much, Laura, for brightening our day with this affirmation of how fortunate we all are to live in Laguna Beach, and for your kind words about Stu News. We do feel that we have a remarkable team and we do love what we do! And we LOVE Laguna too!


Jon Madison will be missed

The news that Jon Madison has sold his business and moved out of Laguna was not a shock, but the swiftness came as a surprise.  Jon will be missed.  While I wish the new owners nothing but the best, it’s hard to imagine Madison Square without Jon, a little like Oz without the wizard. Jon’s café was a place where every person and every dog felt welcome and special.  To borrow from Fanny Flagg’s Fried Green Tomatoes, “It was never more than just a knock about place, but now that I look back on it, when that café closed the heart of the town just stopped beating. It’s funny how a little place like this brought so many people together.”

Jon Stordahl

Laguna Beach


Obituary

Paul Barnard

August 12, 1938 – November 27, 2017

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Paul inserts himself into the void at Le Corbusier’s Notre Dam du Haut in Ronchamp, France

Gentleman, surfer, brilliant architect, master of color – Paul Barnard was all of these, and now he’s gone, slipping away to Mexico and beyond. 

Born in Bailieboro, Ontario, Canada on August 12, 1938, Paul was creative from a young age, preferring the arts to labor on the family farm in Ontario. Attracted to the energy of Toronto, Paul attended the University of Toronto where he received a Bachelor of Architecture. After working and traveling throughout Europe, Paul moved to Boston and received his Master of Architecture in Urban Design from Harvard University in 1967. He married Susan Gleave in 1966 in England and settled in Toronto where their daughter Josey was born in 1968. At the ripe age (for an architect) of 30, Paul designed his parent’s cottage at Batchewana Bay, Ontario. After becoming a partner at WZMH Architects in the 1974, he oversaw the design of projects across the US and Asia. 

To escape the cold winters of the east coast, Paul moved from Canada to Laguna in 1980 to practice architecture in California. Here he married Susan Whitin and had his second child, Seth, in 1987. After a career working on large scale hotels and office buildings, Paul opened up his own studio in Laguna to focus on other building typologies. The Laguna Art Museum is one of his several creative renovations in town. 

An avid hiker and outdoorsman, he and family frequented wild locales across the globe to camp, hike and learn. He always believed one learned more traveling than in school. Fascinated by the ancient cities of South and Central America, he travelled to and studied the urban design practices of Incan, Mayan and Aztecan cultures. Paul’s passion for color drove him to scour Europe in search of obscure natural pigments unavailable in the US. Using color as a design tool, he adorned his designs with these unique pigments. He had an insatiable curiosity.

While growing up on the family farm in Ontario, Paul loved to ride horses. In Laguna, he fulfilled that passion with “Streetwise”, his retired racing horse stabled at Irvine Coast Stables -- on land that is now Crystal Cove. Around town, you could catch Paul on his way to surf San O with his buddies, in a heated conversation at Zinc cafe, or at the dog park with his trusty dogs. 

After living in Laguna for almost 40 years, Paul expatriated to his house in Sayulita, Mexico for a change of scenery and vibes. Shortly after moving to Sayulita, he fulfilled a lifelong dream to live in the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende. 

On November 27, 2017, Paul died peacefully in the cacti-peppered highlands of Central Mexico amongst a loving community of friends and caregivers. His creative, friendly and quirky spirit lives on through the family and friends that love him.

Paul's memorial will be held on Saturday, February 3 at the Laguna Art Museum from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.


Where’s Jason?

We miss Jason Feddy’s banter on his ‘Morning Scramble’ show on KX93.5. What he brings musically both with his talent and knowledge are unique and an asset to our local station. We especially enjoyed his quizzes and police blotter songs. We would like to urge Tyler Russell and the station’s board of directors to please bring him back, even if only on a limited basis! KX93.5 is not the same without him!

Ellen and Roger Kempler

Laguna Beach


Impact of the homeless on home values needs to be addressed by panel

Decades ago I was fortunate enough to be present at a City Council meeting in which representatives of the American Association of University Women made an impassioned presentation advocating the city become a sanctuary city.  The City Council succumbed and voila: Laguna Beach became a sanctuary city.

Thereupon a thin stream of indigents trickled in and took root. They became prominent fixtures at the entrance of the Library on Glenneyre. They leisurely occupied nooks along Ocean Avenue and promenaded along the beach.

Wanting to support these folks and their illegal brethren a hiring center was constructed and manned in the Canyon. Assorted shelters were made available.  The City gave out free bus passes (a continuing program) and constructed a shelter for these unfortunates. Food was made available.

I recall an evening in a Mexican restaurant in which a curiously dressed young lady was shown a table whereupon she ordered and consumed a full meal, stood up and left without paying. The owner simply shrugged his shoulders and smiled; they need help. The Mexican restaurant went out of business.

Now, with the removal of those now occupying the banks of the Santa Ana River, I suspect our village will rise to the task and welcome these poor, misunderstood minions.

Thus, drawn to the natural beauty of the Canyon, one might imagine a quaint hobo jungle developing from lack of space in our Friendship Shelter.

Being an intellectual community, we welcome discussions, and find ourselves invited to spend an enlightened moment with experts on homelessness (for $20). I wonder if the topics these folks cover include the impact on home values as grocery carts stacked high with dross and over stuffed back packs line our back alleys and signs suggesting ‘Work for Food’ become commonplace.

Just a thought, mind you.

John Kountz

Laguna Beach


Coast Inn developer opposes rooftop decks

The owner/developer of the Coast Inn has been dismissive of the concerns of the many neighbors surrounding his development, yet he is well aware of the issues they face, should his project be approved.  

In September 2012 and January 2013, Chris Dornin addressed Planning Commission and City Council with statements in opposition to the rooftop deck at Mozambique. The issues that he presented five years ago are the exact issues that the neighbors around his proposed Coast Inn rooftop deck will be presenting to City Council at Tuesday’s hearing: parking in front of homes, traffic, noise, view, trash, privacy, etc.  

What follows are exact excerpts from his statements which demonstrate that he is well aware that his project will negatively impact the surrounding neighborhoods.  (Video of the full statements is available on the Laguna Beach City website.)

Chris Dornin Statement Sept 12, 2012, Planning Commission Meeting:

“…There’s literally no parking in front of our house during the evenings...”

“…They may have their noise studies but you need to remember this is well above where Coast Highway is and it flows right up hill and it flows right into our bedrooms...”

“…The idea that it’s not going to intensify the traffic is completely silly.  Why spend all this money if you are not going to increase business and increase traffic flow...” 

“…This is going to add significant money to the restaurant in revenue if they are able to do this and it’s going to have detrimental impact to the values in our neighborhood and views like myself.  It is a nightclub.  They charge.  We hear it.  It’s loud.  It’s a privacy, noise and view issue.”

Chris Dornin Statement Jan 15, 2013, Appeal to City Council: “Wear hats”

“…Umbrellas do not provide an ocean view, they are a convenience for the customers. The customers can wear hats. If it’s too sunny, wear hats. They don’t need umbrellas...” 

“…We shouldn’t all sacrifice and the owner make no compromises for any of us and all to the detriment of our home values.  It’s going to have a massive detrimental impact to our home...” 

Terry Meurer

Laguna Beach


The Coast Inn should be a local gem, and it can be

As a small business owner and resident in the neighborhood of the Coast Inn, I am deeply frustrated by the opposition that this project has faced since it was announced.

I have carefully reviewed the documentation related to the project, and it is clear that the developer has longstanding entitlements to renovate the property as has been proposed.

The opposition that the project is facing is coming from a small but vocal group of people who are concerned about the impact the project will have on the surrounding neighborhood.  

The fact that the hotel and liquor store existed long before most people lived in the neighborhood doesn’t seem to register with the critics.

The argument that there’s not enough parking doesn’t hold up when one considers that ride sharing services like Uber and Lyft have forever changed parking requirements.

And finally, one only has to take a walk from Bluebird to downtown on Coast Highway to see the number of vacant storefronts to understand that our town is facing tremendous challenges as the economy is going through transformational change.

The Coast Inn should be a local gem, and we have a group willing and able to make it happen.

To be clear, a revitalized Coast Inn will be good for our business—more visitors, more foot traffic, more vibrancy in our neighborhood.

But the issue goes far beyond what it means for one business.

At the heart of this is whether or not the City of Laguna Beach will adopt a progressive and business friendly position, encourage sensible development, and acknowledge and embrace a rapidly changing marketplace in order to ensure the health and unique character of our special town.

If it is going to be business as usual, I fear that we will simply become a nice place to live for those who can afford it, and the Laguna Beach most of us know and love will be gone forever 

Don Meek

Co-Founder, The Soul Project

Laguna Beach


Supporters’ party is outrageous ploy

I just received a copy email of what the Dornins are planning at the Coast Inn to get letters of approval for the project. Party at the Boom Boom Room. Let us know you’re coming, sign up have some food, drinks? and music to put you in the mood for us to tell you what our plans are and support us.

This is an outrageous ploy by an applicant for a project coming before you this month. They should be held accountable at the CC meeting. I hope you look at this as subterfuge and that the support letters they say they’re hoping to get are from people that actually live in Laguna Beach. If they don’t they should be discounted entirely.

I am not against preserving the Coast Inn and bringing back its historic character, it needs some loving care. But, the plans as they exist now, will leave nothing but a shell of what the Coast Inn was and the neighborhoods surrounding it will be the sacrifice.

Darrylin and Tom Girvin

Laguna Beach

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